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Laid-Back Nursing?

Here’s a question from Carmela in North York:

Q:  My son is now three weeks old and nurses well, but quite often spits up after.  I’ve heard there’s a position called “laid-back nursing” that may help – can you describe this position?

Laid Back NursingA:  Yes, Carmela, the laid-back position can be helpful with reflux, and it’s very comfortable to achieve with the help of a Cozy Cuddles Nursing Pillow!  This is a reclining position for breastfeeding, so lie comfortably on your back, with your nursing pillow supporting your head and shoulders.  This means that your head and shoulders will be propped up at an ideal angle.  Then lay your baby, tummy to tummy with you, with his cheek near your breast. When he latches on, his head will be higher than the rest of his body, so gravity will assist with the reflux tendency.  It’s also a very natural and relaxing position for you both – enjoy!

Originally posted 2015-03-27 10:57:01.

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Nursing too often?

Here’s a question from Jayne in Kincardine, ON:

Q: Can my son be nursing too often? He is 5 days old today, and seems to want to nurse constantly. He nurses and seems to settle, but when I put him down he starts fussing again. He’s making lots of diapers but I’m wondering why he does this – I don’t remember my first son (now 2 ½ ) doing this. I feel so worn out from running after my toddler and nursing all the time!

A: Sounds like you’ve got a lot on your plate, Jayne! Looking after a newborn and a toddler is challenging, especially as you’re recovering from childbirth. Your newborn is engaging in what is known as “cluster feeding”, which means he feeds frequently to signal your breasts to bring in your mature milk. This is a gradual process, and it sounds like your milk is coming in, if he is making “lots of diapers” as you say. A rule of thumb for wet diapers is to expect one on day 1, two on day 2, three on day three and so on until day 6 and onwards when you’re looking for 6-8 soaking wet diapers and multiple stools.

It may be that your fatigue in parenting both children is contributing to the baby’s fussiness. For now, be sure to let all non-essentials like cleaning and phone calls go. A great time to order in food or call in favours from friends who have offered to cook or to spend time with your toddler. Lie down to feed the baby as much as possible to increase your rest time. Hang in there – this phase won’t last long!

Nancy Lahn RN

Developer of the Cozy Cuddles Nursing Pillow

Originally posted 2017-01-07 22:19:45.

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More Questions about Colostrum

Here’s a question we’ve had asked a couple times before, but it’s worth repeating…

Q: I’ve heard that you’re supposed to leak colostrum in late pregnancy, but I haven’t seen a drop. Does this mean I’ll have trouble breastfeeding?

A: Definitely not! In the last weeks of pregnancy, some women leak some colostrum (the yellowish, sticky "first milk"), but many do not. Whether you see it or you don’t, your colostrum is there and it will be there for your newborn as the very best first food. Colostrum is filled with energy and antibodies, and is so concentrated that your newborn only needs a small amount. It will give your baby the best possible start in the world!

Originally posted 2016-10-31 20:59:37.

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Am I still producing enough milk?

Here’s a question from Dianna in Leamington, ON:

Q: Help! My baby is two weeks old now, and has been nursing well, but I’m noticing a real change in my breasts. Last week, my breasts were so full and hard, and now they’re a lot softer even though he’s nursing every couple of hours. Is my milk decreasing?

A: What you describe, Dianna, is very normal. When your milk began to come in last week (usually day 2-3) it sounds like you experienced engorgement, which is a combination of your milk changing from colostrum to mature milk, and accompanying swelling from increased blood flow to the breasts. After a couple of days of frequent nursing, the swelling reduced and you continued to produce milk at the rate that your baby needs. This more efficient production means that your breasts become softer and more comfortable, and baby gets all the milk he needs. As long as he’s producing regular bowel movements and 6-8 wet diapers per day, all is well!

Originally posted 2015-11-27 11:31:43.