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Both breasts at each feeding?

Here’s a question from Marcy in Richmond Hill, ON:

Q: I’m expecting my first child in the middle of April. I’ve tried to read up on breastfeeding but some things you read conflict – for example, some say you should feed the baby from both breasts at a feeding, while others say that one breast is enough. Who’s right?

A: Good question, Marcy! For a first baby, it’s generally advised that you begin your breastfeeding experience by feeding from both breasts at each feeding. On the first side, feed until you notice the sucking and swallowing slowing down or stopping. Then remove the baby from the breast by inserting your little finger into the corner of the baby’s mouth to break the suction. Then burp the baby to remove any swallowed air. If baby is sleepy, many mothers will change the diaper at this time to wake the baby up. Then, offer the second breast. Most babies will take some from this breast until they fall asleep. At the next feeding, offer the breast that you fed from last at the previous feeding. Some mothers use the trick of putting a safety pin on their bra on the side they finish on to remind them to use this breast first next time! Doing this, particularly as your milk is coming in (this typically takes about 6 weeks) gives both breasts equal stimulation and promotes a good breastmilk supply.

Once your breastmilk supply is well established, some mothers find that the baby is satisfied with one breast per feeding, while others continue to offer both breasts at each feeding – you’ll soon become the expert on what your baby needs!

Nancy Lahn RN

Developer of the Cozy Cuddles Nursing Pillow

Originally posted 2016-03-31 12:45:59.

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Breastfeeding after exercise

Here is a question from Carrie in Richmond Hill, ON:

Q: I wonder if you can help me with a question I have – I’m expecting my first child in August and plan to breastfeed. I like to go to the gym and some friends there told me that I should wait several hours after exercising to breastfeed, as the milk could be harmful to the baby. Is this true?

A: Breastfeeding mothers receive lots of strange (and wrong) advice and this is a good example of that! Absolutely not – there is no reason to delay breastfeeding after exercise. And by the way, good for you that you’re continuing to stay fit in pregnancy! Don’t exercise to the point of pain or discomfort, but a healthy level of fitness will benefit you in childbirth and a quicker recovery afterwards.

Nancy Lahn RN

Developer of the Cozy Cuddles Nursing Pillow

Originally posted 2016-06-24 12:43:41.

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Low milk supply?

Here’s a question from Danielle in Lethbridge, Alberta:

Q: My baby is just over two weeks old now, and she’s nursing well. I’m just worried that I’m not producing as much milk as I was at first. A couple of days after she was born, my breasts were very full and firm, and now they’re softer. Does this mean I should pump to get my milk supply back up?

A: If your baby is nursing well and is producing at least six to eight soaking wet diapers daily, your milk supply is fine. The fullness that you experienced the first week is called engorgement, and is normal as the milk is coming in and as more blood flows to your breasts, causing swelling. With frequent nursing and after a couple of days, this engorgement subsides and the breasts soften again. There is no need to pump at this time – breastfeed your baby on demand for the first 4-6 weeks, and after that you can pump to store your milk, or to leave it with a sitter if you are away from your baby for a feeding.

Originally posted 2015-03-21 17:41:17.

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Neck and Shoulder pain?

Here’s a question from Abby in Burlington, ON:

Q: I’m expecting my baby in February, and I’m hoping you can help me. I’ve suffered for several years now with neck and shoulder pain from a sports injury, and my chiropractor said that a nursing pillow could help when I’m nursing the baby. Is your pillow designed to alleviate neck and shoulder pain?

A: Yes, indeed, Abby – not all nursing pillows on the market are helpful in alleviating and preventing neck and shoulder pain, but the Cozy Cuddles Nursing Pillow is designed with this in mind. Our pillow has ideal firmness and thickness to raise the newborn up to breast level, allowing the mother to achieve the proper alignment of neck and spine when breastfeeding. Also, our pillow is large enough to allow a comfortable place for the mother to rest her arms during feeding. This means that neck and shoulder strain are prevented, and it helps to promote comfort for those with a pre-existing condition. Many chiropractors recommend our product for these reasons.

Not all nursing pillows on the market are effective at preventing neck and shoulder pain, however – many are too flat, or quickly flatten out with use. This causes the mother to have lean forward to nurse (which results in discomfort), or she resorts to crossing her legs or using a second pillow to raise the baby up to the proper position. With the Cozy Cuddles Nursing Pillow, the mother can nurse in comfortable correct spinal alignment throughout the feeding, resulting in a happier Mom. Let’s face it – when Moms feel happy and comfortable feeding, they are more likely to nurse long-term, and this results in a win-win situation of healthier Mom and healthier baby!

Nancy Lahn RN

Developer of the Cozy Cuddles Nursing Pillow

Originally posted 2016-01-26 13:32:46.