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Help! Soreness has returned!

Here’s a question from Jade in Sudbury:

Q: My baby’s a month old and has been nursing well. The nipple tenderness I felt at the beginning went away – until now! I feel a shooting pain when she nurses on one side that lasts throughout the feeding, and after as well. The baby often fusses during a feeding and pulls away. I noticed that the milk seems to be curdling in her mouth – it looks like cottage cheese on her tongue! Is this normal in the heat of the summer?

A: What you’re describing, Jade, sounds like a yeast infection, commonly known as “thrush”. It’s caused by the fungus candida albicans and fortunately can be treated by a topical anti-fungal medication you can get from your doctor. (More details: www.PharmaWatchDogs.com) You’ll both need to be treated, as the infection passes between you – that is likely what is causing the white coating on her tongue and your nipple pain. It can also pass through the digestive tract and cause diaper rash, which will also need to be treated.

Nancy Lahn RN

Developer of the Cozy Cuddles Nursing Pillow

Originally posted 2015-09-10 16:06:38.

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Breastfeeding after exercise

Here is a question from Carrie in Richmond Hill, ON:

Q: I wonder if you can help me with a question I have – I’m expecting my first child in August and plan to breastfeed. I like to go to the gym and some friends there told me that I should wait several hours after exercising to breastfeed, as the milk could be harmful to the baby. Is this true?

A: Breastfeeding mothers receive lots of strange (and wrong) advice and this is a good example of that! Absolutely not – there is no reason to delay breastfeeding after exercise. And by the way, good for you that you’re continuing to stay fit in pregnancy! Don’t exercise to the point of pain or discomfort, but a healthy level of fitness will benefit you in childbirth and a quicker recovery afterwards.

Nancy Lahn RN

Developer of the Cozy Cuddles Nursing Pillow

Originally posted 2016-06-24 12:43:41.

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Neck and Shoulder pain?

Here’s a question from Abby in Burlington, ON:

Q: I’m expecting my baby in February, and I’m hoping you can help me. I’ve suffered for several years now with neck and shoulder pain from a sports injury, and my chiropractor said that a nursing pillow could help when I’m nursing the baby. Is your pillow designed to alleviate neck and shoulder pain?

A: Yes, indeed, Abby – not all nursing pillows on the market are helpful in alleviating and preventing neck and shoulder pain, but the Cozy Cuddles Nursing Pillow is designed with this in mind. Our pillow has ideal firmness and thickness to raise the newborn up to breast level, allowing the mother to achieve the proper alignment of neck and spine when breastfeeding. Also, our pillow is large enough to allow a comfortable place for the mother to rest her arms during feeding. This means that neck and shoulder strain are prevented, and it helps to promote comfort for those with a pre-existing condition. Many chiropractors recommend our product for these reasons.

Not all nursing pillows on the market are effective at preventing neck and shoulder pain, however – many are too flat, or quickly flatten out with use. This causes the mother to have lean forward to nurse (which results in discomfort), or she resorts to crossing her legs or using a second pillow to raise the baby up to the proper position. With the Cozy Cuddles Nursing Pillow, the mother can nurse in comfortable correct spinal alignment throughout the feeding, resulting in a happier Mom. Let’s face it – when Moms feel happy and comfortable feeding, they are more likely to nurse long-term, and this results in a win-win situation of healthier Mom and healthier baby!

Nancy Lahn RN

Developer of the Cozy Cuddles Nursing Pillow

Originally posted 2016-01-26 13:32:46.

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Is there a cream for nipple soreness?

Here’s a question from Connie in Toronto, ON:

Q: My baby is four days old. The nurses at the hospital said she has a good latch (we’ve been home for two days now), but my nipples are getting so sore! Is there some kind of cream that will help?

A: You mentioned that the hospital nurses said your baby is latching well – it would be good to confirm this by going back to the breastfeeding clinic at your hospital or Public Health clinic, since a proper latch is critical in avoiding nipple trauma. It is normal to experience some tenderness in the early days of breastfeeding, but pain that does not lessen in the first few seconds after latching can be a sign of other problems, including an improper latch. If the latch is determined to be correct, an excellent nipple ointment is available called APNO – All Purpose Nipple Ointment”. It was developed by Dr. Jack Newman, world-renowned breastfeeding expert whose clinic is right in your hometown of Toronto, Connie! APNO is made up of four ingredients that have been shown to treat a wide variety of nipple problems – you can learn more about it at http://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/content.php?pagename=doc-APNO.

Originally posted 2013-10-01 11:46:14.